Nowadays, Graphics Processing Units (GPUs) are effective platforms for implementing complex algorithms (e.g., for Artificial Intelligence) in different domains (e.g., automotive and robotics), where massive parallelism and high computational effort are required. In some domains, strict safety-critical requirements exist, mandating the adoption of mechanisms to detect faults during the operational phases of a device. An effective test solution is based on Self-Test Libraries (STLs) aiming at testing devices functionally. This solution is frequently adopted for CPUs, but can also be used with GPUs. Nevertheless, the in-field constraints restrict the size and duration of acceptable STLs. This work proposes a method to automatically compact the test programs of a given STL targeting GPUs. The proposed method combines a multi-level abstraction analysis resorting to logic simulation to extract the microarchitectural operations triggered by the test program and the information about the thread-level activity of each instruction and to fault simulation to know its ability to propagate faults to an observable point. The main advantage of the proposed method is that it requires a single fault simulation to perform the compaction. The effectiveness of the proposed approach was evaluated, resorting to several test programs developed for an open-source GPU model (FlexGripPlus) compatible with NVIDIA GPUs. The results show that the method can compact test programs by up to 98.64% in code size and by up to 98.42% in terms of duration, with minimum effects on the achieved fault coverage.

A Compaction Method for STLs for GPU in-field test / Guerrero-Balaguera, Juan-David; Rodriguez Condia, J. E.; Sonza Reorda, M.. - ELETTRONICO. - (2022), pp. 454-459. ((Intervento presentato al convegno 2022 Design, Automation and Test in Europe Conference and Exhibition, DATE 2022 tenutosi a Antwerp (BE) nel 14-23 March 2022 [10.23919/DATE54114.2022.9774597].

A Compaction Method for STLs for GPU in-field test

Guerrero-Balaguera Juan-David;Rodriguez Condia J. E.;Sonza Reorda M.
2022

Abstract

Nowadays, Graphics Processing Units (GPUs) are effective platforms for implementing complex algorithms (e.g., for Artificial Intelligence) in different domains (e.g., automotive and robotics), where massive parallelism and high computational effort are required. In some domains, strict safety-critical requirements exist, mandating the adoption of mechanisms to detect faults during the operational phases of a device. An effective test solution is based on Self-Test Libraries (STLs) aiming at testing devices functionally. This solution is frequently adopted for CPUs, but can also be used with GPUs. Nevertheless, the in-field constraints restrict the size and duration of acceptable STLs. This work proposes a method to automatically compact the test programs of a given STL targeting GPUs. The proposed method combines a multi-level abstraction analysis resorting to logic simulation to extract the microarchitectural operations triggered by the test program and the information about the thread-level activity of each instruction and to fault simulation to know its ability to propagate faults to an observable point. The main advantage of the proposed method is that it requires a single fault simulation to perform the compaction. The effectiveness of the proposed approach was evaluated, resorting to several test programs developed for an open-source GPU model (FlexGripPlus) compatible with NVIDIA GPUs. The results show that the method can compact test programs by up to 98.64% in code size and by up to 98.42% in terms of duration, with minimum effects on the achieved fault coverage.
978-3-9819263-6-1
File in questo prodotto:
File Dimensione Formato  
A_Compaction_Method_for_STLs_for_GPU_in-field_test.pdf

non disponibili

Tipologia: 2a Post-print versione editoriale / Version of Record
Licenza: Non Pubblico - Accesso privato/ristretto
Dimensione 6.23 MB
Formato Adobe PDF
6.23 MB Adobe PDF   Visualizza/Apri   Richiedi una copia
Pubblicazioni consigliate

Caricamento pubblicazioni consigliate

I documenti in IRIS sono protetti da copyright e tutti i diritti sono riservati, salvo diversa indicazione.

Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: http://hdl.handle.net/11583/2968999