After World War II, the city of Maribor, Slovenia’s second-largest city, was mainly set up as an industrial centre, with important factories in the fields of metallurgy, mechanics and chemistry. In the field of urban reconstruction, there were interventions for the reconstruction of the historic centre, real estate and production assets. Within this broad planning policy, efforts were made to qualify spaces for leisure and tourism in an architectural and urban sense. In this context, the city of Maribor was enhanced by the beautiful landscape made by the Drava river, the Pohorje massif and the Slovenske gorice hills. The planning of the Pohorje ski resort, whose cable car was developed as early as 1957, the first on the Balkan peninsula, was a key part of the revitalization of Maribor after the war. Major state intervention was required in order to implement the project. In 1953, architect Branko Kocmut drew up a plan with six access points to the mountain massif. The architect and urban planner Ljubo Humek, together with the skier and winter tourism promoter Franci Čop, was the author of the first regulatory plan for tourism improvement in Pohorje, for which he received the Prešeren prize in 1962. In the following years, the tourist infrastructures multiplied, with the construction of the Hotel Bellevue (Ivan Kocmut, 1956–1962), of the top and bottom stations of the cable car, of the mountain huts and later of the Hotel Habakuk (Magda and Ivan Kocmut, 1972–1974). The promotion of the ski resort was driven by the establishment of the Ski Klub Polet, then Branik (1951), and the women’s slalom competition, Zlata lisica (1964). While the building of tourist infrastructure and accommodation for mountain resorts may be compared to many similar initiatives undertaken in Slovenia and in other Yugoslav republics, the integration between an industrial town and its areas of landscape interest is peculiar to Maribor and reflects the efforts made by its citizens. The case of Mariborsko Pohorje highlights the focus on planning of recreational areas during the socialist period as a process capable of accommodating local demands.

Architectural and landscape design in Mariborsko Pohorje: between leisure planning and tourism development during Yugoslav socialism (1948-1980) / Mercadante, R.. - Dragan Damjanović, Art and the State in Modern Central Europe, Faculty of Humanities and Social Sciences, Zagreb, in press.:(In corso di stampa). ((Intervento presentato al convegno Art and the State in Modern Central Europe (18th- 21st Century) tenutosi a Zagabria (Croazia) nel 30 giugno 2021- 3 luglio 2021.

Architectural and landscape design in Mariborsko Pohorje: between leisure planning and tourism development during Yugoslav socialism (1948-1980)

Mercadante, R.
In corso di stampa

Abstract

After World War II, the city of Maribor, Slovenia’s second-largest city, was mainly set up as an industrial centre, with important factories in the fields of metallurgy, mechanics and chemistry. In the field of urban reconstruction, there were interventions for the reconstruction of the historic centre, real estate and production assets. Within this broad planning policy, efforts were made to qualify spaces for leisure and tourism in an architectural and urban sense. In this context, the city of Maribor was enhanced by the beautiful landscape made by the Drava river, the Pohorje massif and the Slovenske gorice hills. The planning of the Pohorje ski resort, whose cable car was developed as early as 1957, the first on the Balkan peninsula, was a key part of the revitalization of Maribor after the war. Major state intervention was required in order to implement the project. In 1953, architect Branko Kocmut drew up a plan with six access points to the mountain massif. The architect and urban planner Ljubo Humek, together with the skier and winter tourism promoter Franci Čop, was the author of the first regulatory plan for tourism improvement in Pohorje, for which he received the Prešeren prize in 1962. In the following years, the tourist infrastructures multiplied, with the construction of the Hotel Bellevue (Ivan Kocmut, 1956–1962), of the top and bottom stations of the cable car, of the mountain huts and later of the Hotel Habakuk (Magda and Ivan Kocmut, 1972–1974). The promotion of the ski resort was driven by the establishment of the Ski Klub Polet, then Branik (1951), and the women’s slalom competition, Zlata lisica (1964). While the building of tourist infrastructure and accommodation for mountain resorts may be compared to many similar initiatives undertaken in Slovenia and in other Yugoslav republics, the integration between an industrial town and its areas of landscape interest is peculiar to Maribor and reflects the efforts made by its citizens. The case of Mariborsko Pohorje highlights the focus on planning of recreational areas during the socialist period as a process capable of accommodating local demands.
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: http://hdl.handle.net/11583/2968179