A growing body of research is casting light on the intrinsic utility of the traveling activity, something that seems not identifiable with the utility of performing activities at different locations. As a complement to previous speculative and empirical researches on this topic, the present study proposes a measurement model for the intrinsic, or primary utility of travel. A new definition of primary utility is proposed, keeping into account the users of different transportation modes, beyond car drivers. The model is then estimated on a dataset coming from a mixed behavioral and mobility survey, focusing on weekday trips of less than 50 km. Exploratory factor and item analyses define the set of structural equations used in a subsequent hierarchical confirmatory factor analysis. The rationale of this mixed approach is to adequately capture the complexity of the primary utility concept. The proposed model is found to fit the data satisfactorily well. The analysis of the resulting primary utility scores of the reported trips puts into evidence that intrinsic benefits from the traveling activity are not an exclusivity of car drivers and that they can be detected in work-related as well recreational trips.

Making the "primary utility of travel" concept operational: A measurement model for the assessment of the intrinsic utility of reported trips / Diana, Marco. - In: TRANSPORTATION RESEARCH. PART A, POLICY AND PRACTICE. - ISSN 0965-8564. - 42:(2008), pp. 455-474. [10.1016/j.tra.2007.12.005]

Making the "primary utility of travel" concept operational: A measurement model for the assessment of the intrinsic utility of reported trips

DIANA, Marco
2008

Abstract

A growing body of research is casting light on the intrinsic utility of the traveling activity, something that seems not identifiable with the utility of performing activities at different locations. As a complement to previous speculative and empirical researches on this topic, the present study proposes a measurement model for the intrinsic, or primary utility of travel. A new definition of primary utility is proposed, keeping into account the users of different transportation modes, beyond car drivers. The model is then estimated on a dataset coming from a mixed behavioral and mobility survey, focusing on weekday trips of less than 50 km. Exploratory factor and item analyses define the set of structural equations used in a subsequent hierarchical confirmatory factor analysis. The rationale of this mixed approach is to adequately capture the complexity of the primary utility concept. The proposed model is found to fit the data satisfactorily well. The analysis of the resulting primary utility scores of the reported trips puts into evidence that intrinsic benefits from the traveling activity are not an exclusivity of car drivers and that they can be detected in work-related as well recreational trips.
File in questo prodotto:
File Dimensione Formato  
Diana_PrimaryUtility.pdf

accesso aperto

Tipologia: 2. Post-print / Author's Accepted Manuscript
Licenza: PUBBLICO - Tutti i diritti riservati
Dimensione 407.02 kB
Formato Adobe PDF
407.02 kB Adobe PDF Visualizza/Apri
Diana-2008-Making the “primary utility of travel” concept operational.pdf

non disponibili

Tipologia: 2. Post-print / Author's Accepted Manuscript
Licenza: Non Pubblico - Accesso privato/ristretto
Dimensione 213.11 kB
Formato Adobe PDF
213.11 kB Adobe PDF   Visualizza/Apri   Richiedi una copia
Pubblicazioni consigliate

Caricamento pubblicazioni consigliate

I documenti in IRIS sono protetti da copyright e tutti i diritti sono riservati, salvo diversa indicazione.

Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: http://hdl.handle.net/11583/1736141
 Attenzione

Attenzione! I dati visualizzati non sono stati sottoposti a validazione da parte dell'ateneo