Background: Due to the COVID-19 pandemic, teledermoscopy has been increasingly used in the remote diagnosis of skin cancers. In a study conducted in 2020, we demonstrated a potential role of an inexpensive device (NurugoTM Derma) as a first triage to select the skin lesions that require a face-to-face consultation with dermatologists. Herein, we report the results of a novel study that aimed to better investigate the performance of NurugoTM. Objectives: (i) verify whether the NurugoTM can be a communication tool between the general practitioner (GP) and dermatologist in the first assessment of skin lesions, (ii) analyze the degree of diagnostic–therapeutic agreement between dermatologists, (iii) estimate the number of potentially serious diagnostic errors. Methods: One hundred and forty-four images of skin lesions were collected at the Dermatology Outpatient Clinic in Novara using a conventional dermatoscope (instrument F), the NurugoTM (instrument N), and the latter with the interposition of a laboratory slide (instrument V). The images were evaluated in-blind by four dermatologists, and each was asked to make a diagnosis and to specify a possible treatment. Results: Our data show that F gave higher agreement values for all dermatologists, concerning the real clinical diagnosis. Nevertheless, a medium/moderate agreement value was obtained also for N and V instruments and that can be considered encouraging and indicate that all examined tools can potentially be used for the first screening of skin lesions. The total amount of misclassified lesions was limited (especially with the V tool), with up to nine malignant lesions wrongly classified as benign. Conclusions: NurugoTM, with adequate training, can be used to build a specific support network between GP and dermatologist or between dermatologists. Furthermore, its use could be extended to the diagnosis and follow-up of other skin diseases, especially for frail patients in emergencies, such as the current pandemic context.

Teledermoscopy in the Diagnosis of Melanocytic and Non-Melanocytic Skin Lesions: NurugoTM Derma Smartphone Microscope as a Possible New Tool in Daily Clinical Practice / Veronese, Federica; Tarantino, Vanessa; Zavattaro, Elisa; Biacchi, Francesca; Airoldi, Chiara; Salvi, Massimo; Seoni, Silvia; Branciforti, Francesco; Meiburger, Kristen M.; Savoia, Paola. - In: DIAGNOSTICS. - ISSN 2075-4418. - ELETTRONICO. - 12:6(2022), p. 1371. [10.3390/diagnostics12061371]

Teledermoscopy in the Diagnosis of Melanocytic and Non-Melanocytic Skin Lesions: NurugoTM Derma Smartphone Microscope as a Possible New Tool in Daily Clinical Practice

Massimo Salvi;Silvia Seoni;Francesco Branciforti;Kristen M. Meiburger;
2022

Abstract

Background: Due to the COVID-19 pandemic, teledermoscopy has been increasingly used in the remote diagnosis of skin cancers. In a study conducted in 2020, we demonstrated a potential role of an inexpensive device (NurugoTM Derma) as a first triage to select the skin lesions that require a face-to-face consultation with dermatologists. Herein, we report the results of a novel study that aimed to better investigate the performance of NurugoTM. Objectives: (i) verify whether the NurugoTM can be a communication tool between the general practitioner (GP) and dermatologist in the first assessment of skin lesions, (ii) analyze the degree of diagnostic–therapeutic agreement between dermatologists, (iii) estimate the number of potentially serious diagnostic errors. Methods: One hundred and forty-four images of skin lesions were collected at the Dermatology Outpatient Clinic in Novara using a conventional dermatoscope (instrument F), the NurugoTM (instrument N), and the latter with the interposition of a laboratory slide (instrument V). The images were evaluated in-blind by four dermatologists, and each was asked to make a diagnosis and to specify a possible treatment. Results: Our data show that F gave higher agreement values for all dermatologists, concerning the real clinical diagnosis. Nevertheless, a medium/moderate agreement value was obtained also for N and V instruments and that can be considered encouraging and indicate that all examined tools can potentially be used for the first screening of skin lesions. The total amount of misclassified lesions was limited (especially with the V tool), with up to nine malignant lesions wrongly classified as benign. Conclusions: NurugoTM, with adequate training, can be used to build a specific support network between GP and dermatologist or between dermatologists. Furthermore, its use could be extended to the diagnosis and follow-up of other skin diseases, especially for frail patients in emergencies, such as the current pandemic context.
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: http://hdl.handle.net/11583/2967139