The mechanisms by which calcium phosphate bone substitutes evolve and are resorbed in vivo are not yet fully known. In particular, the formation of intermediate phases during resorption and evolution of the mechanical properties may be of crucial interest for their clinical efficiency. The in vitro tests proposed here are the first steps toward understanding these phenomena. Microporous Dicalcium Phosphate Dihydrate (DCPD) samples were immersed in tris(hydroxymethyl)aminomethane (TRIS) and Phosphate Buffered Saline (PBS) solutions, with or without daily refresh of the medium, for time-points up to 14 days. Before and after immersion, samples were extensively characterised in terms of morphology, chemistry (XRD coupled with Rietveld analysis), microstructure (X-ray tomography, SEM observations) and local mechanical properties (instrumented micro-indentation). The composition of the immersion solutions was monitored in parallel (pH, elemental analysis). The results show the influence and importance of the experimental set-up and protocol on the formation of apatite and octacalcium phosphate concurrently to DCPD dissolution; moreover, strong inter-correlations between physico-chemistry, microstructure and mechanics are demonstrated. Statement of Significance Ideally, the resorption kinetics of biodegradable bone substitutes should be controlled to favor the healing processes of bone. Although biodegradable bone grafts are already used in surgeries, their resorption process is still partially unknown. The present work studies these resorption phenomena, their kinetics and mechanisms and their consequences on the properties of a calcium phosphate resorbable material. The original in vitro approach developed in this work couples for the first time physico-chemical, micro-structural and mechanical assessments. The dissolution of the CaP phase in body fluids and the reprecipitation of more stable phases are studied on a local scale, which has permitted to evidence and monitor the development of a gradient of properties between the surface and the core of the samples.

The in vitro evolution of resorbable brushite cements: A physico-chemical, micro-structural and mechanical study / Gallo, M.; Tadier, S.; Meille, S.; Gremillard, L.; Chevalier, J.. - In: ACTA BIOMATERIALIA. - ISSN 1742-7061. - 53:(2017), pp. 515-525. [10.1016/j.actbio.2017.02.023]

The in vitro evolution of resorbable brushite cements: A physico-chemical, micro-structural and mechanical study

Gallo M.;
2017

Abstract

The mechanisms by which calcium phosphate bone substitutes evolve and are resorbed in vivo are not yet fully known. In particular, the formation of intermediate phases during resorption and evolution of the mechanical properties may be of crucial interest for their clinical efficiency. The in vitro tests proposed here are the first steps toward understanding these phenomena. Microporous Dicalcium Phosphate Dihydrate (DCPD) samples were immersed in tris(hydroxymethyl)aminomethane (TRIS) and Phosphate Buffered Saline (PBS) solutions, with or without daily refresh of the medium, for time-points up to 14 days. Before and after immersion, samples were extensively characterised in terms of morphology, chemistry (XRD coupled with Rietveld analysis), microstructure (X-ray tomography, SEM observations) and local mechanical properties (instrumented micro-indentation). The composition of the immersion solutions was monitored in parallel (pH, elemental analysis). The results show the influence and importance of the experimental set-up and protocol on the formation of apatite and octacalcium phosphate concurrently to DCPD dissolution; moreover, strong inter-correlations between physico-chemistry, microstructure and mechanics are demonstrated. Statement of Significance Ideally, the resorption kinetics of biodegradable bone substitutes should be controlled to favor the healing processes of bone. Although biodegradable bone grafts are already used in surgeries, their resorption process is still partially unknown. The present work studies these resorption phenomena, their kinetics and mechanisms and their consequences on the properties of a calcium phosphate resorbable material. The original in vitro approach developed in this work couples for the first time physico-chemical, micro-structural and mechanical assessments. The dissolution of the CaP phase in body fluids and the reprecipitation of more stable phases are studied on a local scale, which has permitted to evidence and monitor the development of a gradient of properties between the surface and the core of the samples.
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: http://hdl.handle.net/11583/2959755