Action observation treatment (AOT) exploits a neurophysiological mechanism, matching an observed action on the neural substrates where that action is motorically represented. This mechanism is also known as mirror mechanism. In a typical AOT session, one can distinguish an observation phase and an execution phase. During the observation phase, the patient observes a daily action and soon after, during the execution phase, he/she is asked to perform the observed action at the best of his/her ability. Indeed, the execution phase may sometimes be difficult for those patients where motor impairment is severe. Although, in the current practice, the physiotherapist does not intervene on the quality of the execution phase, here, we propose a stimulation system based on neurophysiological parameters. This perspective article focuses on the possibility to combine AOT with a brain–computer interface system (BCI) that stimulates upper limb muscles, thus facilitating the execution of actions during a rehabilitation session. Combining a rehabilitation tool that is well-grounded in neurophysiology with a stimulation system, such as the one proposed, may improve the efficacy of AOT in the treatment of severe neurological patients, including stroke patients, Parkinson’s disease patients, and children with cerebral palsy.

Combining Action Observation Treatment with a Brain–Computer Interface System: Perspectives on Neurorehabilitation / Rossi, Fabio; Savi, Federica; Prestia, Andrea; Mongardi, Andrea; Demarchi, Danilo; Buccino, Giovanni. - In: SENSORS. - ISSN 1424-8220. - ELETTRONICO. - 21:24(2021), p. 8504. [10.3390/s21248504]

Combining Action Observation Treatment with a Brain–Computer Interface System: Perspectives on Neurorehabilitation

Fabio Rossi;Andrea Prestia;Andrea Mongardi;Danilo Demarchi;
2021

Abstract

Action observation treatment (AOT) exploits a neurophysiological mechanism, matching an observed action on the neural substrates where that action is motorically represented. This mechanism is also known as mirror mechanism. In a typical AOT session, one can distinguish an observation phase and an execution phase. During the observation phase, the patient observes a daily action and soon after, during the execution phase, he/she is asked to perform the observed action at the best of his/her ability. Indeed, the execution phase may sometimes be difficult for those patients where motor impairment is severe. Although, in the current practice, the physiotherapist does not intervene on the quality of the execution phase, here, we propose a stimulation system based on neurophysiological parameters. This perspective article focuses on the possibility to combine AOT with a brain–computer interface system (BCI) that stimulates upper limb muscles, thus facilitating the execution of actions during a rehabilitation session. Combining a rehabilitation tool that is well-grounded in neurophysiology with a stimulation system, such as the one proposed, may improve the efficacy of AOT in the treatment of severe neurological patients, including stroke patients, Parkinson’s disease patients, and children with cerebral palsy.
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: https://hdl.handle.net/11583/2947274