Global earthing systems (GESs), which are created by the interconnection of local earthing systems, should guarantee the absence of dangerous touch voltages. According to international standards, one of the reasons for this safety characteristic of GESs is that medium-voltage and low-voltage grounding systems form a quasi-equipotential area. Typical examples of GESs are in city centers due to the high number of interconnected grounding systems in the area. For this reason, in addition to ground grids, other metallic parts with different primary functions shall be also considered, e.g., water and gas pipes, tramway tracks, and building foundations can modify the electric potential distribution in the area. In this paper, a model based on the Maxwell's subareas method (MaSM) is used to evaluate how buried metallic parts, which are not intentionally connected to ground grids, modify the electric potential on the soil surface. First, the MaSM model is validated with experimental measurements on a simple electrode configuration. The measured voltages are compared with the MaSM results and with the results obtained with a finite-element method model simulated with COMSOL Multiphysics. Then, the simulations are carried out on a realistic urban test case.

Global Earthing System: Can Buried Metallic Structures Significantly Modify the Ground Potential Profile? / Pons, Enrico; Colella, Pietro; Tommasini, Riccardo; Napoli, Roberto; Pasquale, Montegiglio; Giuseppe, Cafaro; Francesco, Torelli. - In: IEEE TRANSACTIONS ON INDUSTRY APPLICATIONS. - ISSN 0093-9994. - STAMPA. - 51:6(2015), pp. 5237-5246. [10.1109/TIA.2015.2422824]

Global Earthing System: Can Buried Metallic Structures Significantly Modify the Ground Potential Profile?

PONS, ENRICO;COLELLA, PIETRO;TOMMASINI, Riccardo;NAPOLI, Roberto;
2015

Abstract

Global earthing systems (GESs), which are created by the interconnection of local earthing systems, should guarantee the absence of dangerous touch voltages. According to international standards, one of the reasons for this safety characteristic of GESs is that medium-voltage and low-voltage grounding systems form a quasi-equipotential area. Typical examples of GESs are in city centers due to the high number of interconnected grounding systems in the area. For this reason, in addition to ground grids, other metallic parts with different primary functions shall be also considered, e.g., water and gas pipes, tramway tracks, and building foundations can modify the electric potential distribution in the area. In this paper, a model based on the Maxwell's subareas method (MaSM) is used to evaluate how buried metallic parts, which are not intentionally connected to ground grids, modify the electric potential on the soil surface. First, the MaSM model is validated with experimental measurements on a simple electrode configuration. The measured voltages are compared with the MaSM results and with the results obtained with a finite-element method model simulated with COMSOL Multiphysics. Then, the simulations are carried out on a realistic urban test case.
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: http://hdl.handle.net/11583/2603158