Global Navigation Satellite Systems (GNSS) have been in the center stage of the recent technological upheaval that has been initiated by the rise of smartphones in the last decade. This is clearly reflected in the development of many applications based on GNSS technology as well as the emergence of multi-constellation GNSS with the launch of the first Galileo satellites at the end of the year 2011. GNSS does not only guarantee global positioning, navigation and timing services but also extends to applications in banking, agriculture, mapping, surveying, archaeology, seismology, commerce, ionosphere scintillation monitoring, remote sensing (soil moisture, ocean salinity, type of surface), wind speed monitoring, ocean surface monitoring, altimetry and many others. In the last decade, Location Based Services (LBS) have increased significant market demand where GNSS has been coupled with technologies based on terrestrial communication links in order to meet strict positioning accuracy requirements. In these conditions, relying on GNSS technology alone, raises a few challenges for signal synchronization even before positioning attempts and are mainly due to a considerable signal attenuation as it propagates through construction material and into indoor environments. Ionosphere scintillation induces a similar challenge where in addition to amplitude fading, the carrier phase and frequency suffer from indeterministic fluctuations. This research activity is devoted to explore and design the elements constituting pilot channel scalar tracking loop systems, specifically tailored to Galileo signals. It is expected that running such systems with extended integration intervals offers robust synchronization of the incoming signal which is heavily affected by external indeterministic fluctuations. In some conditions, it is desired to follow these fluctuations as in ionosphere scintillation monitoring while in other instances it is mainly desired to filter them out as noise to guarantee positioning capabilities. This is the objective of this research study which applies for both indoor environments and ionosphere scintillation affected signals. Towards this endeavor, a comprehensive theoretical study of the carrier and code tracking loops elements is undertaken, and particular attention is directed to the following aspects: • carrier frequency and phase discriminators and the relative optimum integration time • Galileo specific code discriminators and code tracking architecture especially tailored to Composite Binary Offset Carrier (CBOC) modulated signals. • optimum loop filters designed in the digital domain for different types of phase input signals • local signal generation using a numerically controlled oscillator and loop filter estimates • front-end filter bandlimiting effects on the tracking performance. This design is further tested with simulated Galileo signals with and without ionosphere scintillation as well as raw Galileo signals in an equatorial region during March 2013. Tracking performance comparison is carried out between the customized Galileo receiver developed in this research activity and an ionosphere scintillation dedicated professional GNSS receiver, the Septentrio PolaRxS PRO R receiver.

Design of pilot channel tracking loop Systems for high sensitivity Galileo receivers / Kassabian, Nazelie. - (2014). [10.6092/polito/porto/2546138]

Design of pilot channel tracking loop Systems for high sensitivity Galileo receivers

KASSABIAN, NAZELIE
2014

Abstract

Global Navigation Satellite Systems (GNSS) have been in the center stage of the recent technological upheaval that has been initiated by the rise of smartphones in the last decade. This is clearly reflected in the development of many applications based on GNSS technology as well as the emergence of multi-constellation GNSS with the launch of the first Galileo satellites at the end of the year 2011. GNSS does not only guarantee global positioning, navigation and timing services but also extends to applications in banking, agriculture, mapping, surveying, archaeology, seismology, commerce, ionosphere scintillation monitoring, remote sensing (soil moisture, ocean salinity, type of surface), wind speed monitoring, ocean surface monitoring, altimetry and many others. In the last decade, Location Based Services (LBS) have increased significant market demand where GNSS has been coupled with technologies based on terrestrial communication links in order to meet strict positioning accuracy requirements. In these conditions, relying on GNSS technology alone, raises a few challenges for signal synchronization even before positioning attempts and are mainly due to a considerable signal attenuation as it propagates through construction material and into indoor environments. Ionosphere scintillation induces a similar challenge where in addition to amplitude fading, the carrier phase and frequency suffer from indeterministic fluctuations. This research activity is devoted to explore and design the elements constituting pilot channel scalar tracking loop systems, specifically tailored to Galileo signals. It is expected that running such systems with extended integration intervals offers robust synchronization of the incoming signal which is heavily affected by external indeterministic fluctuations. In some conditions, it is desired to follow these fluctuations as in ionosphere scintillation monitoring while in other instances it is mainly desired to filter them out as noise to guarantee positioning capabilities. This is the objective of this research study which applies for both indoor environments and ionosphere scintillation affected signals. Towards this endeavor, a comprehensive theoretical study of the carrier and code tracking loops elements is undertaken, and particular attention is directed to the following aspects: • carrier frequency and phase discriminators and the relative optimum integration time • Galileo specific code discriminators and code tracking architecture especially tailored to Composite Binary Offset Carrier (CBOC) modulated signals. • optimum loop filters designed in the digital domain for different types of phase input signals • local signal generation using a numerically controlled oscillator and loop filter estimates • front-end filter bandlimiting effects on the tracking performance. This design is further tested with simulated Galileo signals with and without ionosphere scintillation as well as raw Galileo signals in an equatorial region during March 2013. Tracking performance comparison is carried out between the customized Galileo receiver developed in this research activity and an ionosphere scintillation dedicated professional GNSS receiver, the Septentrio PolaRxS PRO R receiver.
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: https://hdl.handle.net/11583/2546138
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